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Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

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(no subject) [Nov. 23rd, 2015|06:25 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

kitegirl24
Is there a place I can buy pre-chopped veggies of the organic variety??

I know this may be very location-specific... but figured it's worth a try asking here.

I want to eat organic foods, and I like to eat a lot of fresh veggies, either in salads or cooked in the crock pot for the day... but I'm going to be pretty busy for a while, so I want to buy pre-chopped stuff. Which I see in the grocery stores around here (like ShopRite) all the time.... but, not the organic varieties.

Is this something Whole Foods might have? Trader Joe's?

The google machine doesn't seem very helpful here, and I just wanted to run this by people who might know without making phone calls to a bunch of places that are a little out of the way ;)

x-posted a few places...
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(no subject) [Apr. 25th, 2015|09:24 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

kitegirl24
Check out my new community, nutritarianism :)

Discussion, tips, and support for nutritarian eating.

Dr. Fuhrman coined the word "Nutritarian" to describe his recommended diet which concentrates on eating the most micronutrient rich foods.

What is Dr. Fuhrman’s Nutritarian Diet?

Simply put, a Nutritarian diet is a way of eating which bases food choices on maximizing the micronutrients per calorie. A Nutritarian diet is designed with food that has powerful disease-protecting and therapeutic effects and delivers a broad array of micronutrients via a wide spectrum of food choices. It is not sufficient to merely avoid fats, consume foods with a low glycemic index, lower the intake of animal products, or eat a diet of mostly raw foods. A truly healthful Nutritarian diet must be micronutrient rich and the micronutrient richness must be adjusted to meet individual needs. The foods with the highest micronutrient per calorie scores are green vegetables, colorful vegetables, and fresh fruits. For optimal health and to combat disease, it is necessary to consume enough of these foods that deliver the highest concentration of nutrients.

A Nutritarian diet is guided by nutritional quality.


read more about Dr. Fuhrman's recommendations, and the nutritarian diet, at:

http://www.drfuhrman.com/library/what-is-a-nutritarian-diet.aspx


x-posted lots of places :)
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Easy Paleo Veggie Recipes – Roasted Broccoli and Cauliflower [Feb. 19th, 2015|05:07 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle
paleodietrules
[mood |moodymoody]

One of the biggest struggles that people I’ve helped start on the Paleo diet has been to eat enough vegetables. It’s amazing how little the average American actually consumes on a day to day basis.

But to truly thrive, you’re body needs the vitamins and minerals that we get from veggies. So I’m going to do a recipe that is about as simple as it gets. If you don’t like raw broccoli or cauliflower, give this recipe a try. It gives these two super foods some extra flavor. And the addition of fats from olive oil help your body assimilate the nutrients more easily. I’ll be doing another post soon with a couple other easy roasting recipes. One of them involves bacon, and it is DAMN good.

OK, it doesn’t get any simpler than this one. All you need is salt, pepper, broccoli, cauliflower, a bit of olive oil, and about 30 minutes.

Ingredients:

1 package of Trader Joe’s broccoli and cauliflower mix

1 Tbsp olive oil (or grass-fed beef tallow if you’ve got it)

1/2 tsp salt

Pepper to taste

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

One note, broccoli cooks more quickly than cauliflower. If you prefer your broccoli to have a bit more texture, then add it with about 15 minutes left.

Dump the bag of broccoli and cauliflower in a bowl. Drizzle olive oil (or your fat of choice) and toss. Then add the salt and pepper. Toss again. Pour the veggies onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper or aluminum foil. You don’t have to use foil or paper, but it makes clean up much quicker.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Serve and enjoy.

Easy Paleo Veggie Recipes
source: http://www.paleodietrulesandguidelines.com
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The Onion [Mar. 30th, 2010|09:59 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

likethewatch
[Tags|]

http://www.theonion.com/video/stouffers-to-include-suicide-prevention-tips-on-si,17129/

Stouffers To Include Suicide Prevention Tips on Their Single Serve Microwaveable Meals (video)
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ACT TODAY! Or Kiss Your Organics Goodbye! [Mar. 2nd, 2010|11:21 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

orangeface
After years of bureaucratic wrangling, a recent USDA environmental review may finally approve Monsanto’s GMO alfalfa. If approved, GMO alfalfa will fundamentally undermine the entire organic industry overnight. In addition, the USDA says Americans consumers don't care about the contamination of organics. ACT TODAY: comments are due by close of business Wednesday, March 3rd.

http://fdn.actionkit.com/cms/sign/make_a_stand_for_organics/?source=taf

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(no subject) [Jul. 10th, 2009|10:23 am]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

orangeface
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Spring Food: Nourishing Traditions [Apr. 20th, 2009|01:13 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

likethewatch
[Tags|]

I have been cooking up a storm. I have read Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon, for the first time. This is the bible of the Weston A. Price movement, and I had subscribed, for what it was worth, to their ideas, based on what I'd read, on the Foundation website but also on Beyond Vegetarianism. Finally reading what Fallon had to say about raw milk products, especially whey, made me want to run right out and get a gallon of raw milk from my local dairy farmer. I kept reading, and she kept on impressing me with the importance of adding whole categories of foods to my diet, or learning to enjoy them far more often, such as with organ meats, which I usually eat maybe once or twice a year in the form of chopped chicken liver.

Other foods that Fallon is just as emphatic about, are already in my diet. It was good to know exactly how bone broth is nourishing, and encouragement to continue making my own stocks and using them often to make soups and stews. It was time for me to make a big batch of beef stock, so I followed her recipe, which adds a little vinegar for extracting as much of the mineral as possible from the bones. I used apple cider vinegar, because I have some that is raw, organic, and unfiltered. Keeping the heat very low, and simmering it for an extremely long time--all weekend--were the other important steps. I knew from fine cooking sources that you have to keep the temp low on stock to keep it clear, and per the WAP people, and others, too, this preserves nutrients that can be destroyed by rapid boiling. Gelatin is the magic component of stock: it creates thickness, and is a "protein sparing" food. Fallon notes that gelatin-rich soups aid in digestion, explaining why they are often served before a meal.

This is good hot soup weather. Overcast, rainy days. Everything is blooming or trying to mate: the birds were so noisy and various this morning, they were cracking me up. My sinuses are killing me.

After I made the giant beef stock, I used some to make French onion soup. I topped it with baby Swiss and Gruyere, made buttered croutons out of commercial whole wheat sandwich bread. Kevin raved about this soup in his blog. He makes about three blog entries a year, so that's impressive. There's a little cheese left over after the soup was eaten, and we've been putting it on our scrambled eggs. Kevin thinks Swiss and its relatives are made for eggs. I prefer Cheddar cheese, find something oddly reeking about Swiss.

Since I already had so much chicken stock in the freezer, I decided to make a chicken soup next. I bought a whole chicken and stewed it in chicken stock, using the crock pot's probe to cook the chicken til it was done. I took the meat off the bones, put the meat and the stewing stock in a large pot with chopped carrots, celery, and leek, and simmered it all gently for a while. Then I added parsley and frozen spinach. In a separate pot, I heated some more chicken stock and cooked dumplings in it. The dumplings came out green because I put the ingredients from Bittman's butter dumplings recipe in a food processor instead of mincing the onion and herb, and mashing the butter with a fork.

I rediscover dumplings every year or so, make the same remarks about how my mother used to make a dumpling she called a "clunker." They were dense and bland. Until I talked about making chicken and dumplings with Kevin, I was going to put homemade egg noodles in the soup: I thought that was what it was. So I looked up Bittman's dumplings and made those, and they were green, and fluffy and sort of tasty. I don't think dumplings are supposed to be taste sensations.

x-posted to my journal and healthfood_porn
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Brooklyn foodies in NYT [Feb. 26th, 2009|12:02 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

likethewatch
Great food porn here. Take notes if you're in NYC, or planning a visit. I am most excited about this:

"[Tom] Mylan also teaches butchering at the Brooklyn Kitchen, a kitchen supply store in Williamsburg. He demonstrates with a whole pig. Every student goes home with six pounds of fresh pork."

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/25/dining/25brooklyn.html
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Rice Rice baby... [Jan. 22nd, 2009|03:12 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

sinnymaker
I know, dorkiest thing I ever said but was trying to think of a catchy subject line. I was given a rice/sushi rice maker (one of those really neat ones) as a gift and looking forward to making loads of brown rice sushi and rice based meals. However, looking online I can't seem to get that many straight answers on rice and weight loss.

I am not looking to completely live on a rice diet but I would like to have brown rice almost daily as part of my meals.. well homemade sushi really :) Just concerned what even comsuming rice within my calorie range and with all the protein and fats I need that it will somehow stunt my weight loss.

I mean so many diets are completely based around rice, in Japan they even have rice with miso in the mornings (which I am very much looking forward to making more with steamed puffy rice) and are bone skinny. I know that rice based diets can help you lose weight/wont effect your weight loss, but are the rules in that?

Lean meats and veggies, moderation, take your time in eating.. any other tips?
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Winter inspiration [Jan. 11th, 2009|01:36 pm]
Whole Foods: the anti-Twinkie lifestyle

likethewatch
[Tags|]

I'm a big fan of Bittman; here's his advice on stocking a pantry: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/07/dining/07mini.html

Good seasonal advice: ideas for using winter vegetables and things that don't go bad, like dried beans.

I'd improve on his butternut squash preparation method: I use a melon baller to scrape out the seeds, and peel the squash, before baking.
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